Theft

Theft in Texas: What Does It Look Like?

Simply put, a person commits theft when they take something that doesn’t belong to them without the owner’s knowledge, consent, or reasonable legal justification, and without any intention of returning the property to the owner at the time of the offense.

Theft Offenses in Texas

The state of Texas, like many other states, categorizes theft offenses according to the value or type of the stolen property or services. Here’s a breakdown of how theft charges work in Texas:

  • Class C Misdemeanor Theft – The stolen property or services is valued at less than $50. Penalties involve no jail time and a $500 maximum fine.
  • Class B Misdemeanor Theft – The stolen property or services is valued between $50 and $500. Penalties include a maximum jail sentence of 180 days and/or a $2,000 maximum fine.
  • Class A Misdemeanor Theft – The stolen property or services is valued between $500 and $1,500. Penalties include a maximum jail sentence of one year and/or a maximum $4,000 fine.
  • State Jail Felony Theft – If the stolen property or services is valued between $1,500 and $20,000, then the charge is classified as state jail felony theft. However, you can still get charged with state jail felony theft if the property is firearms or livestock that has a value of less than $20,000. Penalties include a jail sentence ranging from 180 days to two years and a $10,000 maximum fine.
  • Third-Degree Felony Theft – The stolen property or services is valued between $20,000 and $100,000. Penalties include incarceration ranging between two and 10 years in a Texas state prison and a $10,000 maximum fine.
  • Second-Degree Felony Theft – The stolen property or services is valued between $100,000 and $200,000. Penalties include incarceration ranging between two to 20 years in a Texas state prison and a $10,000 maximum fine.
  • First-Degree Felony Theft – The value of the stolen property or services exceeds $200,000. Penalties include incarceration ranging between five to 99 years in a Texas state prison and a maximum $10,000 fine.

Keep in mind that any past convictions could impact the charge you receive for the current offense. For example, if you have one prior theft conviction, a theft charge that would normally be designated as a Class C misdemeanor will be bumped up to a Class B misdemeanor. Similarly, a person with two prior theft convictions who commits a theft crime that would normally be designated as a Class A misdemeanor will instead be charged with state jail felony theft.

For these reasons, it’s crucial to work with a criminal defense attorney who will fiercely advocate for you both in and out of court. Here at Kimbrough Legal, we have the legal know-how and courtroom experience to help you get the restitution you deserve. To take your first step towards justice, contact us today.